Author: Kalafi Moala

Alea fakapulipuli Pule’anga mo e Digicel ta’e’ilo ki ai Fale Alea Ke fakatau atu ‘inasi kautaha Tonga Cable Ltd.

‘OKU fakaofo ‘a e feinga ‘a e Pule’anga ke fakatau atu ‘a e ngaahi ‘inasi ‘o ‘ene kautaha Tonga Cable Ltd, ‘a ia ‘oku toe ‘i ai mo e ‘inasi peseti ‘e 20% ai ‘o e kautaha TCC. Ko e kautaha pe foki mo ‘eni ‘a e Pule’anga, pea ko e taha ‘eni e kautaha tupu lahitaha ‘a e Pule’anga. Kā, ‘oku ‘ohovale ‘a kinautolu ‘i he Fale Alea ‘i he teke ‘a e Pule’anga, pe ko e Kapineti, ke fakatau atu ‘a e ngaahi ‘inasi ‘o e Tonga Cable Ltd. ki he kautaha Digicel, ta’efakahā ange ‘a e me’a ni ki he Fale Alea. Hangē koee ne fai fakapulipuli ‘a e alea mo e Digicel, pea toe ‘ikai loto e Pule’anga ke ‘ilo ki ai pe kau ange ha taha ki he alea ko ‘eni. Na’e ‘ohake ‘i he Fale Alea ‘o Tonga ‘i he uike ni ‘e Lord Nuku pe ko e ha kuo fakahoko ai ‘e he Pule’anga ‘a e alea fakatau ‘inasi ko ‘eni ta’e’omai ki he Fale Alea? Na’e pehē ‘e Lord Nuku na’e te’eki ai ke fakahā ki he Fale Alea ‘a e me’a ni. Na’a ne fehu’ia foki ‘a e fa’ahinga founga ngāue ko ‘eni ‘a e Pule’anga ‘a ia ‘oku ‘ikai ke kau mai ki ai ‘a e kakai ‘i hono ‘ilo ki he me’a ni, pe fai hano talanga’i pe...

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It could have happened to Tonga

Residents of the Kingdom of Tonga cannot be more happy and most grateful after Cyclone Winston came close to Vava’u but by-passed the islands with damages that were not that significant. After they saw what Winston did to Fiji, Tongans were shocked and humbled, realizing that what happened to Fiji could have happened to Tonga as well. The cyclone came close to the northern island of Vava’u but then moved on. It was only a category 2 cyclone then. There were damages to crops and the authorities have warned that there could be food shortages in a couple of months when harvesting was expected. However, Tonga is sending to Fiji a naval boat with supplies. It is the first Pacific nation to pledge help to the cyclone stricken nation. Cyclone Winston moved north east of the Tonga group but then went into a loop and turned back south-west toward the end of the week, striking the Lau Group of Fiji and then the main islands of Vitilevu and Vanualevu. By the time it struck Fiji, it had built up into Category 5, the strongest category for recorded cyclones. When Cyclone Winston completed its destructive drive through Fiji, authorities declared that it was the worse that had ever struck Fiji. Other reports say that it was the worse that had even been recorded in the southern hemisphere. In an address...

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Trouble looms for Tonga’s seasonal workers

If there has been a breakthrough to income flowing in to the national economy, it’s been because of the seasonal worker schemes called RSE in New Zealand, and it’s Australian equivalent called SWP – Australia’s Seasonal Worker Program. It is estimated that over $10 million has come in to the country annually as a result of these labor mobility schemes, and in the past 12 months up to 2000 seasonal workers have participated in the schemes.   But the scheme has not been without its problems, only now the problems are getting a bit out of control that there have been debates in Parliament about it, and top Tongan Government officials have been dispatched to Australia to talk with their counterparts as well as the farm employers concerned.   A Noble member of Parliament raised an accusation that Tongan workers are being mistreated in Australia, resulting in some running away or not complying with their work agreements.   The list of complaints ranged from expensive inadequate accommodation (charged to the earnings of the workers), to excessive fees being deducted from the workers’ pay, as well as a lot of misunderstanding on a number of issues.   Most of the complaints come out of the Australia scheme. The New Zealand scheme has its own problems, but it has an advantage that there is a Government representative on ground and a...

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Fepaki Lao mei he Pule’anga mo e Konisitutone: Lord Fusitu’a

‘OKU fakafepaki’i fefeka ‘e Lord Fusitu’a, mo ha ni’ihi ‘i he Fale Alea ‘a e Fakatonutonu ki he Lao Fakaangaanga ki he Lao ki he Fakamo’oni 2016, he ‘oku ne tui ‘oku tu’u fehangahangai ‘a e fakatonutonu ko ‘eni mo e Konisitutone. Ko e fakatonutonu ko ‘eni ki he Lao Fakamo’oni kuo ‘omai ‘e he Pule’anga ki he Fale Alea, ke “’ikai fiema’u ha toe fakamo’oni pau (collaboration evidence) mei he mamahi fekau’aki mo e faka’iloa.” ‘I he lolotongá ‘oku fai’aki pe ‘a e fakapotopoto ‘a e Fakamaau ‘i he ‘ene vakai ki he fakamo’oni mei he mamahi pea mo e faka’iloa, kā ‘oku fiema’u ‘e he Pule’anga ke “fakafaingofua’i” ‘a e ngaue ‘a e Fakamaau’anga fekau’aki mo e me’a ni, lolotonga ko ia ‘oku ‘ikai ko e makatu’unga ia ke fai hano fakatonutonu ‘o e Lao, tautefito kapau ‘oku ‘i ai ‘a e tui ia ‘oku fepaki ‘a e fakatonutonu ko ia mo e Konisitutone. ‘I he fakamalanga ‘a Lord Fusitu’a ki he Komiti Kakato, na’a ne fakatātā’aki ‘a e ‘omai ki he Fakamaau’anga ha tokotaha kuo ‘i ai hano hisitolia ki ha hia. “Pehē mai he Fakamaau tama ko ‘eni kuo hia ia, ‘oku ‘osi pau ‘oku halaia ia. Kapau te tau fua’aki e me’a sivi ko ia ‘e ala hoko ke fakahala’ia’i ha taha pehē ‘oku lolotonga tonuhia, pea ko e ‘uhinga ia ‘oku ‘ikai keu...

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Lord Fusitu’a argues against amendments to the Criminal Offences

  Lord Fusitu’a, noble representative from Niua, who is also a practicing attorney, argued in Parliament that the amendments proposed by the Government to the Criminal Offences Act are unconstitutional.   Other Members of Parliament, notably, Hon. Samiu Vaipulu, former Deputy Prime Minister, also aired the noble’s concerns.   The main issues debated had to do with two amendments to the Criminal Offences Act (Section 126 and 127) tabled by the Government.   The first was to withdraw any need for “collaborative evidence” by the victim of a crime. In other words, the testimony of the victim was enough...

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